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A abbreviation for the Latin term “exempli gratia”, which means “for example”. Most people just use the abbreviation “ex.” instead, but e.g. is quite common too.

Example: In our Architectural History class, we were shown

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(pronounced ERTH toobz)

Earth tubing is a zero-energy, geothermal solar heating and cooling system that is low-tech and sustainable. Also known as earth-air heat exchangers, it works by having filtered fresh air enter a

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(pronounced ERTH-shihpz)

An earthship is a term used to describe a home built with materials available in one’s local area, cutting down on the fossil fuels and energy required to get the materials to

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(pronounced EE-stern keeng) See California

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(pronounced ih-BUL-yehnt)

Though this fun word can officially have a slightly negative slant, it’s you traditionally hear it used in a very positive way. Think of the “bull” in ebullient as “boil,” and it’ll help

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(pronounced ih-KI-nehs)

Another classical architectural term here. On a Doric capital, the echinus is circular block that supports the abacus, and its profile is a type of non-circular curve — i.e., it looks kind of

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(pronounced ay-KLAH) If uneducated in French, this word is dangerously similar to the word for a luscious, cream-filled, chocolate-topped tasty pastry. So educate yourself. This French term is noun that can mean either great brilliance, splendor, conspicuous success, or

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(pronounced EE-coh ruf)

See green roof.

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(pronounced EE-coh-BA-lehnts)

See life cycle assessment.

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(pronounced ED-eh-figh)

This verb is commonly used in a religious and/or moralistic context, but it is not limited to that function. In its most basic use, it means to inform or enlighten, and since